Over 50GB

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So we have contacted you, and we have agreed on what to move where. Here's what will happen now.

1. Once you've told us what to move and where to move it, our servers will start copying data over.

But even when that is done, you won't be moved unless you log off from all LWPs.

2. So at some point in time, you log off entirely, from all LWPs, when you leave from work in the evening. You also turn off your computer, lest some process fails to stop and keeps the NFS server thinking you're logged in.

3. The next morning (bar some malfunction) when you log in, your home directory is now on another server. Moreover, the directories marked for /project are no longer where they were. They are now in /project/whatever_name_we_agreed_on.

Please note that

ls /project

will not show anything. Only when you actually access a directory under /project will it be mounted and shown.

If ls /project/yourdir still doesn't show anything, the most likely cause is that your computer hasn't run for at least 20 minutes since we created the the /project/yourdir share. Your computer must be told about it (once) by the Puppet agent, which runs every 20 minutes.

Danger!

Do not access /project/whatever_name_we_agreed_on/moved-dirs until ~/moved-dirs have vanished from your home directory. While ~/moved-dirs still exist, the copy under /project is just that: a copy. It may lag behind, or be incomplete, or be currently written by our scripts, or all of these. By accessing it, you now have modifications in both copies. That constitutes a mess, and since we warned you, it is you who gets to sort it out.

Once ~/moved-dirs have vanished, your account has been migrated, and the new path under /project is the only one. Only then is it fine to use it.

Handy symlinks

Once you have been migrated (and not sooner, see the danger above), you could create symlinks from the old location to the new one:

ln -sT /project/whatever_name_we_agreed_on/somedir ~/somedir

There are programs that will treat a symlink differently from an ordinary file or directory, but most will keep working as if nothing had happened.